Censorship by ommision: Josh Fox Arrest Was Under-Reported

February 3, 2012

I believe the arrest of Josh Fox was woefully under-reported on local and network television, and in local print media. Myself ,and others, have not observed any local or national television coverage of this fiasco. A search of their websites was equally fruitless.

I have seen no coverage today,  either.

I should mention,  I do not get the cable news channels.  But my focus here is on the local and mainstream media.

If I am accurate (even partially), for many NEPA citizens – the incident never happened.

Instead we were offered super bowl recipes, groundhog abuse, sports adoration, celebrity worship, weather obsession, and (“unfortunately”) there was little time left for actual news.  This small window of news programming gives censorship an excuse: “Gee whiz , we just can’t cover everything!”

Josh’s arrest was news. It was big news.

He is a national figure who lives nearby in Wayne County. He is a Sundance  Film Festival winner and an Oscar nominee. “Fracking” is an issue  widely known and debated in our region.  It  threatens each of us in various ways.  What’s not to report??

He was hand-cuffed and his constitutional rights were denied him.

That should always be big news in a democracy.
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What puzzles me is the lack of information about the arrest on the ABC News website. I did a search, “Josh Fox Arrested” and came up with nothing. Josh Powell – Yes. Josh Fox – no. This is especially surprising given that an ABC film crew was present at the same hearing and also denied “permission” to film the hearings. They complied. Josh did not.  He stood up for journalistic and constitutional rights.

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Here is an update from Rueters:
Gasland Director Josh Fox Released After D.C. Arrest; Feb. 15 Court date set
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Here: is Josh speaking about the arrest on msnbc’s The Ed Show

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”…no subcommittee rule or regulation should prohibit a respectful journalist or citizen from recording a public hearing.” – Josh Fox

I am reminded of all the meetings Audrey Simpson has recorded.  Thanks Audrey.  You are a hero.

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Even if

July 14, 2010

Even if one manages the drilling like an angel, and has the luck of God… even if, there are inspectors hanging from every rig… and ten feet of regulations at each worker’s side, even if… even if…

It will not change the inexorable facts that with each fracking: we retire millions of gallons of drinking water from the earth’s scarce supply, and we saturate the air with pollutants.  Also, we horizontally fracture miles of rock  below us, and fill those sharded caverns with a toxic slurry of brine, radioactivity, and nasty chemicals.  That is the present state of reality.  Even if we don’t want to believe it.


Poetry Project – a poem by R

March 19, 2010

We all breathe the same air
drive the same roads
see the same sky.
So is it any wonder why
we don’t want our land to die?

Richer, poorer, privileged or middle class
all of us live here
now in fear
of losing what some take for granted
and others hold dear.

To lose our land and our health
all for ill-gotten wealth
is more than we can bear.
We must be strong in the fight.
We can only do this if we UNITE.


the FrackMountain Poetry Project

March 15, 2010

I invite anyone/and everyone to submit a poem (or song, essay, rant) related to BIG GAS, the Marcellus play, the beauty of this area, its heritage….you get the idea.   I will start things off:

who will want their milk?

Once fields of clover
now radiated mud,

the neighbor cows –
still chewin’ cud.

At my table
I sit and think,

Next time I better buy
elsewhere’s drink.


fracadelia

March 11, 2010

New arrival to the Violations and Accidents vault : Talisman Energy – Fuel spill reported in Armenia Township

Check this out: Texas earthquakes may be linked to wells for gas mining

Here is a great letter sent to me as a comment. It is long and complex, but filled with golden nuggets of insight

Good update on the national political front: from Audobon

Today,  Steve Corbett (WILK radio) related how EnCana Corporation was avoiding an interview.  More on Encana in days to come I’m sure.

It is not just water contamination.  It is also air.  See the Split Estate movie to to find out what Ecana is really like.


Marcellus drilling creates new world

March 10, 2010

A compelling letter:

“Much has been written, and will continue to be written, about the Marcellus shale; on one side about how much money and jobs it will bring, and on the other, about how much environmental damage may result. But this battle of words, being waged by gas development’s proponents and opponents, is mostly speculative. There is probably some truth as well as exaggeration coming from both sides, but the argument may be missing the point. Here in Susquehanna County we are beginning to experience the reality – and the reality is very disheartening.

If you own land to which you are not particularly attached, or which represents only an investment – something to log, or quarry, or exploit in some other way – the Marcellus is just another opportunity. But if you live in the country because you love the rural aesthetic, because you seek solitude, or the joy of experiencing the natural world, you are in for a very unpleasant surprise. You are going to be living in the middle of an industrial zone.

In Dimock over the past year, gas well pads have been installed or are being planned at a rate of one for every 80 acres or so, meaning roughly eight gas well pads per square mile. You will inevitably be within eyesight and ear shot of at least one gas well, and will have numerous well sites in and around your community. Each well pad is a prominent graveled work yard of three to five gated acres, including large pits, tanks, pipes, valves, generators and exhaust stacks. Each has a heavy-duty gravel access road, and each has a 30- to 40-foot-wide pipeline swathe going to the next well pad in a continuous network across the countryside. Your rural landscape will be transformed by bulldozers into an industrial complex. Everywhere you look you will see their handiwork.

Once you and your neighbors sign leases, you will no longer be the masters of your lands. The gas exploration companies will take over, first with miles of wire and small dynamite charges every 100 yards to map the rock below, then with road building, pad development, pipeline clearing and drilling. Gas company employees will be polite, but firm about their rights to your land.

While the process of development and drilling goes on, you will be subject to the noise and vibration of a major industrial operation. The coming and going of work crews and the trucking of millions of gallons of frack water, waste water and miles of piping will dominate your roadways. When they flame off the new gas wells, the light from the huge roaring torches will brighten the night sky for miles around. You will feel like you are living in J.R.R. Tolkien’s Mordor.

Your world will not return to normal for many, many years to come. They will not simply sweep through an area and then be gone. The gas companies will cap the wells, re-open the wells, re-drill the wells in different directions, add more wells at the same site, or build new sites around you for many years and perhaps decades to come, depending on the market and their own timetable. They will be here until the gas runs out.

Natural gas may be a great benefit to our local economy – and will make a lot of people a lot of money – but for the majority of us who revere the natural world, it represents the loss of the beauty and tranquility that brought us to the countryside in the first place. And for those who live on small rural lots or are tenants, there isn’t even any compensation for their loss.

We can argue forever about the pros and cons, but the reality is that our lives, our communities and our natural environment will never be the same.”

Keith Oberg
Brackney, Pa.

source:stargazette.com


“Meet Josh Fox” (GASLAND filmaker)

February 26, 2010

Mark Cour is a  prolific and well regarded blogger from Wilkes-Barre.  His most recent post presents three videos of Josh Fox speaking and taking questions.  I plan to watch them later today when done with my cyber-chores.  See them at:

Circumlocution for Dummies